February 19, 1865: Providing for Columbia

Columbia after the fire

I guess the Pottery Barn rule applies: You break it, you bought it. Howard works to provide some food for the destitute in Columbia, especially the former slaves, and they provide some firearms for the local police to keep the peace.


COLUMBIA, S. C., February 19, 1865.
Doctor GOODWYN,
Mayor of Columbia, S. C.:

DEAR SIR: I have directed the salt and the other provisions at the depot to be hauled to the new capitol and to be put under your charge. I will also send you some cattle to-morrow at 6. 30 o’clock and will leave them in the campus of the college hospital, where you must have them guarded. You will do well to advise the destitute citizens to leave Columbia for the country as far as possible. You had better organize foraging parties, under the direction of reliable citizens, that will go into the country and take provisions in your name, giving a receipt. Some such forced loans will be necessary to relieve the present necessities by the fire. I will furnish you 500 head of cattle, and expect you to provide for destitute citizens, and particularly the negroes that are now here and helpless.

Very respectfully,
O. O. HOWARD,
Major-General.

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By command of Major General F. P. Blair:

C. CADLE, JR.,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
Columbia, S. C., February 19, 1865.

In the name of the citizens of the city of Columbia, I, T. J. Goodwyn, mayor of the city, do pledge my honor that a certain lot of arms and accounterments, to wit, 100 stand of arms, with the ammunition thereto belonging, to be turned over to me by the U. S. military authorities, shall be used in preserving the peace in the city, and shall never be employed in any way against the United States Government or to advance the interests of the so-called Southern Confederacy.

T. J. GOODWYN,
Mayor of the City of Columbia, S. C.
Attest:
C. CADLE, Jr.,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

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