October 26, 1864: No, Sherman hasn’t endorsed McClellan for president

George B. McClellan

The New York Times prints a letter from John C. Hamilton along with his correspondence with Sherman. There is a rumor that Sherman is persuading soldiers to vote for McClellan. Sherman denies vehemently doing anything to influence the votes of his men, and gives Lincoln a rather tepid endorsement.

General Sherman and the Presidential Election.
Published: October 26, 1864

No. 17 WEST TWENTIETH-STREET, NEW-YORK, Oct. 24, 1864.

To the Editor of the Herald:

Having noticed in the Herald of the 20th of September last, the subjoined paragraph, I transmitted it to Gen. SHERMAN, with the remark: “I feel that an expression of opinion by you contradictory of the inclosed statement, in a form avoiding everything personal, would be of importance.” I give you his reply, marked with all the elevation of his noble character. You will be so kind as to make it public.

JOHN C. HAMILTON.

“But we have heard a statement relative to a private letter from Gen. SHERMAN, containing the following words, or words to this effect: ‘I believe that ninety-nine out of every hundred soldiers in this army’ — the laurelled army of Atlanta — ‘would vote for Gen. MCCLELLAN, whether with or without my consent; but if my influence can suffice to make the hundreth man cast his vote the same way it shall not be wanting.’ This report we give as one known to us to be prevalent in army circles, but without vouching for its accuracy.”

HEADQUARTERS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSISSIPPI, IN THE FIELD, KINGSTON, GA., Oct. 11, ’64.

MY DEAR SIR — There is not one word of truth in the paragraph you sent me cut from the New York Herald of September 20. I never thought, said or wrote that MCCLELLAN would get “ninety-nine out of every one hundred” votes in the army. I am as ignorant of the political bias of the men of this army as you are at a distance of a thousand miles, and I would as soon think of tampering with a soldier’s religion as with his preference for men. I have not and shall not attempt to influence a vote in the coming struggle. I believe Mr. LINCOLN has done the best he could. With respect, &c.,

JOHN C. HAMILTON, Esq. W.T. SHERMAN.

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