July 1, 1864: Sherman moves to flank Johnston again.

Atlanta campaign map

Sherman sends Schofield forward on the left, and he winds up pushing further than expected. With a commanding position on all the roads in Sherman’s front, he has a valuable position, so Sherman sends some reinforcements from McPherson. Meanwhile, Sherman orders McPherson to push down around the right to threaten Johnston’s supply line, hoping to get him off Kennesaw mountain.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI
[July 1, 1864.]
General SCHOFIELD:

It is not reasonable to suppose Joe Johnston will keep at Villa Rica anything more than a cavalry force of observation. If General Stoneman deems it impossible to occupy the position of Sweet Water Town, let him take position across Sweet Water Creek, below Powder Springs, and put a regiment in observation near Salt Springs, on the road between Villa Rica and Sweet Water Town. The enemy’s cavalry force will then be divided, and that is what I want.

W. T. SHERMAN,
Major-General, Commanding

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Kenesaw, July 1, 1864.
General SCHOFIELD:

I have ordered the telegraph wire to follow. To what point do you want it? Leave some person to show the road to the repair party. Is there a practicable road from Clark’s across by Byrd’s position to that of Reilly? I want Stoneman, if necessary, to fight hard for that position at Sweet Water. Did you get a fair proportion of the stores yesterday?

W. T. SHERMAN,
Major-General, Commanding.

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SCHOFIELD’S HEADQUARTERS,
July 1, 1864
Major-General SHERMAN:

I shall want the telegraph line to Cheney’s or some point beyond. I will have a man show the way. There is a good road from Clark’s to Byrd’s position, and from there to Reilly’s. I think Stoneman will get the position. He was here last evening and understands the importance of it. My trains were loaded last night. I have not heard what amount the got, but presume a fair share. My troops are moving. I am about starting to the front, and will keep you advised of our progress.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,
Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,
In the Field, July 1, 1864-3 p.m.
Major-General SHERMAN:

We have advanced as far as the cross-roads, meeting with a stubborn resistance all the way. The enemy’s force seems to be increasing. I am now trying to get the point where the Marietta and Ruff’s Mill roads intersect, which is about half a mile to the left of the Sandtown road. My position will be very extended.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,
Major-General.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, near Kenesaw Mountain, July 1, 1864.
General SCHOFIELD:

According to my maps, the position at Wade’s was as far as I expected you to take. I intended to put McPherson at Ruff’s and Daniels’ Mills and at Widow Mitchell’s; but hold fast all you make, and intrench. Let me be fully advised to-night.

W. T. SHERMAN,
Major-General, Commanding.

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SCHOFIELD’S HEADQUARTERS,
July 1, 1864-9 p.m.
Major-General SHERMAN:

The line has been down, so that I could not communicate with you till now. I got your dispatches about the position you desired me to take and about Stoneman’s movements. I found it necessary to go beyond Wade’s about three-quarters of mile to get control of the roads. I have got the desired position and am intrenching securely. The Powder Springs road comes in at Wade’s; the Ruff’s Mill road branches of one-quarter of a mile beyond Wade’s, and intersects the Marietta road at Moss’, only quarter of a mile from the Sandtown road, on which we moved. The Marietta road comes into the Sandtown road only half a mile from Moss’, and three-quarters of a mile from Wade’s. Hascall holds all those cross-roads, and his position is good. His artillery reaches the Nickajack, and his pickets are near it. The enemy seems to be in force beyond the creek. There is a cross-road leaving the Sandtown road about half a mile in front of Reilly and joining the Marietta road about half a mile to the left of Hascall. Cox has a brigade on that cross-road commanding the Marietta road. The rest of his troops are in their old position. I do not hear anything of Colonel Barter being relieved. I now need him very much. My two divisions are too far apart to support each other, but their positions are good. We will make them as strong as possible, and hold what we have if it is in our power. Stoneman reports this evening that he has found only a small rebel force west of the Sweet Water. He sent a detachment to Sweet Water Town and found the bridge there strongly guarded. I will send him your instructions. My loss to-day is not more than 50 killed and wounded, among them same valuable officers.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,
Major-General

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, July 1, 1864.
General SCHOFIELD:

If you apprehend the want of help I can order McPherson to send a division at once. Your positions all seem good. The bridge at Sweet Water is held by cavalry, or course, who will quit as soon as McPherson reaches Mrs. Mitchell’s. He will not get there till the day after to-morrow.

W. T. SHERMAN,
Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,
In the Field, July 1, 1864-9.45 p.m.
Major-General SHERMAN:

I think it would be well for McPherson to send a division to-night. My positions are too important to be hazarded. There appears no force in my front this evening that can drive me away, but of course I cannot tell what there may be in the morning.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,
Major-General.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, near Kenesaw, July 1, 1864.
General McPHERSON:

General Schofield to-day had advanced farther than I contemplated. He has control of all the roads from Reed’s to Maple’s. You know his command is small, and though there is no force now that can disturb him, he thinks there may be in the morning. I want you to start one of your divisions down about 4 a.m. and to act in support of Schofield until your command gets there the next day.

W. T. SHERMAN
Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,
HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISS.,
In the Field, near Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. Numbers 31.
July 1, 1864

The object of the contemplated movement is to deprive the enemy of the great advantage he has in Kenesaw as a valuable watchtower from which to observe our every movement; to force him to come out of his intrenchments or move farther south. To obtain which end:

I. All army commanders will fill up their wagons at Big Shanty depot to the utmost capacity with provisions, ammunition, and forage. The chief quartermaster and commissary will give all necessary orders to clean out the depots in front of Allatoona, and so instruct that the locomotives, and cars will come forward of Allatoona with great caution, and only when ordered by the chief quartermaster.

II. Major-General Thomas will hold the ground below Kenesaw as far as Olley’s Creek near Mount Zion, Major-General Schofield that from Olley’s Creek to the Nickajack, and General McPherson will move his train and troops rapidly in a single march and as little observed from Kenesaw as possible to the Sandtown road, and down it to the extreme right, with one corps near the Widow Mitchell’s, another near Ruff’s Mill, on the Nickajack, and the third in reserve near the forks of the road.

III. General Garrard’s cavalry will cover the roads out of Marietta which pass north of Kenesaw, and General Stoneman’s cavalry will occupy Sweet Water Old Town, coincident with the movement of McPherson. In case the enemy presses Garrard back by superior and overwhelming forces he will send one of his brigades to the flank of General Thomas and with the others fall back gradually toward Allatoona, disputing every foot of ground.

IV. Major-General McPherson will threaten the Chattahoochee River and also the railroad and General Thomas will press the enemy close and at the very earliest possible moment break his lines and reach the railroad below Marietta. All movements must be vigorous and rapid, as the time allowed is limited by the supplies in our wagons.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:
L. M. DAYTON,
Aide-de-Camp.

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NEAR KENESAW, GA., July 1, 1864-9.30 p.m.
(Received 12 m. 2d.)
Major General H. W. HALLECK,
Washington, D. C.:

General Schofield is now south of Olley’s Creek, and on the head of Nickajack. I have been hurrying down provisions and forage, and to-morrow night propose to move General McPherson from the left to the extreme right, back of General Thomas. This will bring my right within three miles of Chattahoochee and about five of the railroad. By this movement I think I can force Johnston to move his army down from Kenesaw, to defend his railroad crossing and the Chattahoochee, when I will, by the left flank, reach the railroad below Marietta; but I cut loose from the railroad with ten day’s supplies in wagons. Johnston may come out of his intrenchments and attack General Thomas, which is what i want, for General Thomas is well intrenched, parallel with the enemy, south of Kenesaw. I think Allatoona, and the line of the Etowah are strong enough for me to venture on this move. The movement is substantially down the Sandtown road, straight for Atlanta.

W. T. SHERMAN,
Major-General.

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