January 18, 1863: McClernand tells Grant how to organize his troops

Major General U. S. Grant

McClernand explains carefully to Grant how he ought to divide up his troops more evenly between Morgan and Sherman.

Official Records:


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
Steamer Tigress, January 18, 1863.
Major General U. S. GRANT,
Commanding Department of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: General Ewing’s brigade has been attached to General Sherman’s corps in pursuance of your order. This addition gives General Sherman’s corps thirty-one regiments, and, according to his last official returns, 25,042 men to twenty-three regiments and 18,000 men in General Morgan’s corps. I wish to call your attention to this disparity, not doubting in absence of any good reason to the contrary you will at once equalize the strength of the corps.

It would be agreeable to General Morgan that General Osterhaus’ old brigade, consisting of the Third, Twelfth and Seventeenth Missouri, the Forth Ohio Battery, and Seventy-sixth Ohio, Colonel Woods, should be transferred to the Second Division, commanded by General Osterhaus, of General Morgan’s corps. The same division was formerly commanded by General Morgan himself. Nor would this arrangement be disagreeable to any one so far as I know.

With this arrangement, General Sherman would have twenty-seven regiments to General Morgan’s twenty-seven.

Neither the supplies of ordnance commissary, and quartermaster stores sent for by me, or referred to in your dispatch of the 13th instant as ordered by you, having arrived, although sufficient time has elapsed, I have to urge that you will cause such supplies to be forward without delay.

To be caught without such stores, particularly ordnance stores, at so remote a point as the vicinity of Vicksburg, with the river infested by guerrillas, wounded indeed be a dilemma.

Your obedient servant,
JOHN A. McCLERNAND,
Major-General, Commanding.

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