Category Archives: Georgia

August 9, 1864: Sorry, no black troops available

Sherman may not be enthusiastic about black soldiers, but he’d like to have some for garrison duty to relieve troops from Nashville for use at the front. Unfortunately, there aren’t any available. WASHINGTON, August 9, 1864. Major-General SHERMAN: Dispatch of … Continue reading

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August 8, 1864: Sherman probes the right

Hood’s got cavalry lurking around his far right flank, and Sherman wants to probe that way. He wants Kilpatrick to distract them while Schofield develops the enemy’s positions. HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, near Atlanta, August … Continue reading

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August 7, 1864: Settling down to a siege?

Grant reassures Sherman that his progress is satisfactory, and Sherman asks for more recruits and proposes to besiege Atlanta at length. He also reminds Grant to get out of Washington as quickly as possible, to avoid contamination from politicians. WASHINGTON, … Continue reading

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August 6, 1864: Sherman, you’ve got the railroad

Sherman wrote the war department asking for complete control of the Northwestern Railroad, in order to supply his troops around Atlanta. He also expressed some concern that people think he’s moving too slowly. He got both the railroad and reassurance. … Continue reading

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August 5, 1864: Getting rid of Palmer

General W.J. Palmer’s XIV Corps isn’t moving aggressively enough for Sherman. It’s sort of convenient for him that Palmer is angry over Schofield’s promotion over him and is leaving. HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, near Atlanta, … Continue reading

Posted in Atlanta, George Thomas, Georgia, J.M. Schofield, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

August 4, 1864: Sherman reports the capture of Stoneman

Grant heard rumors of Stoneman’s capture; Sherman confirms that he’s heard them too. Since he’s not back, it seems likely. NEAR ATLANTA, GA., August 4, 1864-1.30 p. m. (Received 9 p. m. 5th.) Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT, City Point: … Continue reading

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August 3, 1864: War profits

As long as everyone is fleeing Atlanta, might as well unload those tents you have in stock… DAILY CONSTITUTIONALIST [AUGUSTA, GA , August 3, 1864, p. 2, c. 5 Refugees Attention I have two or three extra fine Tents, which … Continue reading

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August 2, 1864: Hood’s still aggressive

Hood writes to President Davis with his plans. Having beaten Sherman’s cavalry, he thinks he can attack his supply lines and force him to attack entrenched positions or withdraw. Official Records: ATLANTA, GA., August 2, 1864. His Excellency President DAVIS, … Continue reading

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August 1, 1864: Stoneman captured

Sherman finds out that the missing Stoneman, and his subordinate McCook, have been captured south of Atlanta. While he succeeded in destroying some railroad beforehand, it’s a major blow to Sherman. Here he pieces together the story, and in conclusion, … Continue reading

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July 31, 1864: Where’s Stoneman?

Sherman’s cavalry, sent out to break the railroads in the rear of Atlanta, seem to be having some issues. Garrard comes back having been repulsed by Wheeler’s rebel cavalry, while Stoneman is known only by rumor. If he’s gone to … Continue reading

Posted in Atlanta, George Stoneman, Georgia, Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, Joseph Wheeler, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment