Category Archives: Edwin M. Stanton

May 10, 1865: Halleck to Stanton and Sherman

Halleck seems a bit two-faced, as he tells Stanton not to let Schofield command North Carolina, since he was involved in Sherman’s treaty with Johnston — then he writes to Sherman on the same day to tell him what a … Continue reading

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April 26, 1865: Johnston surrenders again.

Sherman and Johnston met again, this time with Grant present, and Johnston surrendered on the same terms Grant gave Lee. Official Records: RALEIGH, N. C., April 26, 1865-7. 30 p. m. (Received 10 a. m. 28th.) Honorable E. M. STANTON: … Continue reading

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April 25, 1865: Sherman responds

Sherman tells Stanton that he recognizes he didn’t have the authority to make an agreement on civil matters, and he also writes to Grant — in both cases he’s trying to justify his position, and is perhaps understandably defensive. He … Continue reading

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April 23, 1865: Grant coming to Sherman unannounced

Grant’s coming to order Sherman to end his truce with Johnston, and he’s not telling him in advance. BEAUFORT, N. C., April 23, 1865-6 p. m. Hon E. M STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington: Have just reached here and will … Continue reading

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April 22, 1865: Halleck sends Grant to end Sherman’s truce

Halleck fears that Davis will attempt to escape with considerable amounts of gold, and Stanton informs him of Sherman and Johnston’s truce. Grant reports to Halleck that he’s on his way to North Carolina to meet with Sherman and revoke … Continue reading

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January 12, 1865: Freemen in Savannah

Secretary of War Stanton came down to Savannah, and he met with a group of black leaders to discuss with them what they wanted for their people. He took the opportunity to ask them how Sherman had treated them, as … Continue reading

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December 17, 1864: Sherman demands the surrender of Savannah

From Sherman’s official report: On the 17th, a number of 30-pounder Parrott guns having reached King’s Bridge, I proceeded in person to the headquarters of Major-General Slocum, on the Augusta road, and dispatched thence into Savannah, by flag of truce, … Continue reading

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December 13, 1864: Sherman takes Fort McAllister

From Sherman’s official report: The enemy had burned the road bridge across the Ogeechee, just below the mouth of the Cannouchee, known as King’s Bridge. This was reconstructed in an incredibly short time, in the most substantial manner, by the … Continue reading

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November 11, 1864: Located the leak in Sherman’s army

As we’ve seen, Sherman’s plans are getting printed in northern papers. Grant complains to Stanton, who says it’s Sherman’s own fault. Official Records 79:740 CITY POINT, VA., November 11, 1864. Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War: All the Northern … Continue reading

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October 25, 1864: Sherman on black troops.

Sherman writes to the secretary of war about black troops. If black men fight, they’ll insist on equality. Sherman doesn’t think they’re ready for it. He also thinks that white men should all be fighting for their country, and then … Continue reading

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