Category Archives: Henry Halleck

October 13, 1864: Grant to Stanton — Let Sherman go.

Grant tells Secretary Stanton that he agrees with Sherman’s plan to head for Savannah. He then orders Halleck to prepare supplies to be sent to Savannah to meet Sherman’s armies when they arrive. He tells Halleck that Thomas should abandon … Continue reading

Posted in Atlanta, Edwin M. Stanton, George Thomas, Georgia, Henry Halleck, Sherman's March, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

October 11, 1864: I can do it.

Sherman writes to Halleck, thanking him for supporting his decision to evacuate Atlanta, and again explains his view that it is harder to hold Atlanta than to take it. He wants to tear up the railroad to Chattanooga and push … Continue reading

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October 4, 1864: Grant sides with Sherman

Yesterday, Halleck wrote to Grant to urge him (although he denied that was what he was doing) to send Sherman to Mobile rather than Savannah. Grant replies that Savannah is the only viable option now. Official Records: CONFIDENTIAL.] HDQRS. ARMIES … Continue reading

Posted in Alabama, Georgia, Henry Halleck, Mobile, Sherman's March, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

October 2, 1864: Halleck doesn’t like Sherman’s plan

Sherman wrote to Grant yesterday that he views Hood’s advance northward as leaving Georgia open to attack. He has floated the idea of heading for the Georgia capital, Milledgeville, and ultimately to Savannah. Back in August, he suggested that if … Continue reading

Posted in Alabama, Georgia, Henry Halleck, John Bell Hood, Mississippi, Mobile, Sherman's March, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

September 25, 1864: I’d take Augusta, but…

Sherman would like to take Augusta next, but with his supply line back to Chattanooga threatened, and no guarantee of resupplying if he pushes through to Savannah, he isn’t ready to move. Official Records: ATLANTA, GA., September 25, 1864-6. 30 … Continue reading

Posted in Georgia, Henry Halleck, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

September 22, 1864: Farragut’s unwell

Looks like Farragut isn’t going to be able to do much to further Sherman’s grand plan, but he will wait on the east coast to support Sherman if he heads for the sea. NEW ORLEANS, LA., September 22, 1864. Major-General … Continue reading

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September 16, 1864: Halleck congratulates Sherman

Sherman and Halleck were old friends, and occasionally they wrote each other warm personal notes. In this letter, Halleck praises Sherman’s Atlanta campaign, commiserates with him over the state “Negro recruiters”, and dishes a little dirt on Hooker, who left … Continue reading

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August 26, 1864: Heading for Jonesboro

Sherman has decided to draw Hood out of his defenses. He sends the Twentieth Corps to hold on to the north side of Atlanta, while the rest of his army proceeds south in three columns to break the railroads to … Continue reading

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August 24, 1864: Sherman prepares to move south

In his daily report to Halleck, Sherman announces that he’ll be starting his planning circuit around the south of Atlanta tomorrow. He warns that he won’t be in touch for a while. Official Records: NEAR ATLANTA, GA., August 24, 1864-7.15 … Continue reading

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August 22, 1864: Kilpatrick returns.

After everyone got a little nervous, Kilpatrick returned from his Macon expedition, and reports considerable success. They broke up a fair amount of railroad track, and had a lot of prisoners, though they had to release them rather than haul … Continue reading

Posted in Atlanta, Georgia, Henry Halleck, Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment