Category Archives: Military

October 1, 1864: Sherman has an idea.

Sherman writes to Grant. Hood seems likely to be heading north to threaten Tennessee. Here’s a thought: let Hood go to Tennessee, where Thomas has already been detached, and in the meantime, Sherman can march across Georgia. To someplace on … Continue reading

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September 30, 1864: Hood moving north

John Bell Hood ************************************************** Sherman finds that Forrest is threatening Nashville, while at least part of Hood’s infantry is north of the Chattahoochee. While there is some cause for concern, leading Thomas to forbid furloughs for his troops till the … Continue reading

Posted in Atlanta, George Thomas, Georgia, John Bell Hood, Nathan Bedford Forrest, Sherman's March, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

September 29, 1864: Sherman exchanges prisoners

Sherman has completed an exchange of 2000 prisoners, and is happy to have them out of Andersonville. Hood is still south of Atlanta. Sherman has sent Thomas to clear rebels out of Tennessee, and he plans to head for Milledgeville, … Continue reading

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September 28, 1864: Ewing successfully evacuates Fort Davidson

The New York Times reports on the battle of Fort Davidson. Ewing’s “defeat” is both a tactical victory in terms of the relative casualty numbers, and a strategic victory, in that Price’s assault on St. Louis will never develop. St. … Continue reading

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September 27, 1864: Battle of Fort Davidson

General Price led a rebel attack on Pilot Knob, on his way to attack St. Louis. The Union garrison under the command of Brigadier General Thomas Ewing, though outnumbered 10 to 1 and mostly inexperienced, held off poorly conceived attacks … Continue reading

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September 26, 1864: Grant wants Sherman to take Forrest out

Sherman and Grant discuss Sherman’s next move. Grant would like Sherman to go after Forrest first to get him out of Tennessee. Sherman’s willing, but spread thin protecting his supply line. CITY POINT, VA., September 26, 1864-10 a. m. Major-General … Continue reading

Posted in John Bell Hood, Nathan Bedford Forrest, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

September 25, 1864: I’d take Augusta, but…

Sherman would like to take Augusta next, but with his supply line back to Chattanooga threatened, and no guarantee of resupplying if he pushes through to Savannah, he isn’t ready to move. Official Records: ATLANTA, GA., September 25, 1864-6. 30 … Continue reading

Posted in Georgia, Henry Halleck, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

September 24, 1864: Forrest heads for Tennessee

Forrest is attacking at Athens, AL — about 100 miles due south of Nashville. There is some dispute about the strength of his force, and even whether it is really his. Regardless, it appears he intends to threaten Tennessee, probably … Continue reading

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September 23, 1864: Hood up to something

Brig. Gen Hugh Judson Kilpatrick ************************************************ Kilpatrick reports to Sherman that Hood has cavalry across the Chattahoochee to his southwest, and is threatening the railroad line back to Chattanooga. Sherman’s position in Atlanta is precarious; he has to supply his … Continue reading

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September 22, 1864: Farragut’s unwell

Looks like Farragut isn’t going to be able to do much to further Sherman’s grand plan, but he will wait on the east coast to support Sherman if he heads for the sea. NEW ORLEANS, LA., September 22, 1864. Major-General … Continue reading

Posted in David Farragut, Henry Halleck, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment