Category Archives: Military

January 29, 1865: Sherman to Grant

Sherman takes the time to explain his plans to Grant in detail, as he prepares to move on from Pocotaligo, South Carolina. He’s headed for Columbia and Goldsborough. Official Records: HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, Pocotaligo, … Continue reading

Posted in Sherman's March, South Carolina, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

January 28, 1865: Winding up

The New York Times sees the end coming. The Winding-up Campaign. The campaign which has already been opened by Gen. SHERMAN, and in which the armies operating before Petersburgh and Wilmington, will soon take part, will be the winding-up campaign … Continue reading

Posted in Confederacy, Sherman's March, Ulysses S. Grant, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

January 27, 1865: Ugly Sherman

The Richmond Daily Dispatch runs a fair and balanced portrait of Sherman and the situation in Savannah. I learned something new from this — turns out “Mokanna” refers to “Al-Muqanna“, a muslim prophet who wore a veil; depending on your … Continue reading

Posted in Georgia, Savannah, Sherman's March, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

January 25, 1865: Sherman heading to Sister’s Ferry

Sherman sends order’s to the wing under Slocum to move on into South Carolina. He’ll meet them at Sister’s Ferry. Official Records: HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, Savannah, Ga., January 25, 1865. Major-General SHERMAN, Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi: DEAR GENERAL: … Continue reading

Posted in Henry W. Slocum, Sherman's March, South Carolina | Leave a comment

January 22, 1865: Have supplies ready at Wilmington

Sherman plans to get back to the sea at Wilmington, NC, so he asks for supplies to be stocked up there. Assuming they manage to take Wilmington. HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, Hilton Head, S. C., January 21, 1865. Confidential … Continue reading

Posted in North Carolina, Sherman's March, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

January 22, 1865: And here are the mules

As we’ve seen, Sherman ordered land to be divided among the freed slaves, and today he orders that livestock not needed for the army be distributed among them as well. Official Records: HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, Hilton Head, S. … Continue reading

Posted in Georgia, Reconstruction, Sherman's March, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

January 21, 1865: Sherman aiming for the heart

The New York Times is maybe a little defensive about its right to speculate on Sherman’s next movement, but clearly he’s going through the Carolinas. Now that the knotty case of Wilmington may be considered as successfully settled, the eager … Continue reading

Posted in Sherman's March, South Carolina, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment

January 21, 1865: “… not more than forty acres of tillable ground…”

Sherman allocates abandoned plantations to the freedmen; the original order is dated Jan. 16, but the one actually putting the order into practice is dated Jan. 21; both are below. Abolitionist and medal of honor recipient general Rufus Saxton was … Continue reading

Posted in Reconstruction, Rufus Saxton, Slavery | Leave a comment

January 17, 1865: Borrowing troops from the Army of the Tennessee?

I couldn’t follow everything about this exchange from what was in the official records, but apparently Beauregard and others agree that the Army of the Tennessee needs to be reorganized — not surprising, since it was pretty much destroyed by … Continue reading

Posted in Alabama, John Bell Hood, Pierre G.T. Beauregard, South Carolina, William J. Hardee | Leave a comment

January 16, 1865: Sherman’s coming

Hardee and his troops report Sherman’s forces advancing into South Carolina. Official Records: MONTGOMERY, ALA., January 16, 1865. General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Tupelo, Miss.: General Hardee reports on 14th instant enemy in heavy force advancing from Beaufort, by Port Royal … Continue reading

Posted in Pierre G.T. Beauregard, Sherman's March, South Carolina, William J. Hardee, William Tecumseh Sherman | Leave a comment