A day in Antofagasta

Turkey VulturesTurkey Vultures on masts in the Antofagasta harbor  

Thursday after breakfast Hamner, Peggy, and I set out to walk to the jetty with the lighthouse, where we’d seen some promising birds from afar the day before.  Robin’s hip and knee weren’t up to it, and furthermore the all-in-one washer/dryer had failed to dry our clothes, so she opted to stay and dry stuff with the hair dryer a while. We walked out on the historic pier (Muelle Historico), which was the original site of the nitrate exports that made Antofagasta.  It, like pretty much everything in Antofagasta, was covered with Turkey Vultures.  Never saw so many. We continued on to the mall, which is right on the waterfront, and has an outdoor walkway with a nice view of a rocky cove.  There we saw a lot more vultures, gulls, a Whimbrel, and an American Oystercatcher.   The walkway continued around to the south, giving us a good enough view of the lighthouse jetty to determine that it’s a working port, and not accessible to us.  So I set up the scope to see what we could find on it.

Lighthouse at Antofagasta

Lighthouse jetty

 

It was covered with Peruvian Pelicans, and also quite a few cormorants of all three local species – Neotropic, Red-legged, and Guanay.  Hamner asked if there were nests on the far end of the pier, and I looked with the scope; they were actually ends of rebar sticking out.  Gray gulls were sitting on them, along with three Inca Terns – very cool birds, and sadly I don’t have a photo that does them justice.  But a lifer anyway.

Neotropic CormorantNeotropic Cormorant  

When we turned around to head back, it was after 10 AM, so the mall was open, specifically the Juan Valdez patio coffee shop.  Hamner and Peggy got some real coffee.  We’ve been drinking instant most of the trip, which seems to be the norm here (yecch).   An Oasis Hummingbird buzzed around some ornamental plantings nearby. On the way back, I took another look at the rocky cove, and was rewarded with a Blackish Oystercatcher.  The light wasn’t too good, but apparently it was a juvenile, with an orange/yellow bill instead of the adult’s bright red.  But then Hamner spotted a second, and it was grown up.  A second lifer for the morning, and a decent photo of it. By the time we got back, it was time for lunch, and then we all set out for the Antofagasta Museum.  It’s free, and not large, but we did learn a bit about the history of the place.  It’s been inhabited for about 10,000 years by fishing people; the Spanish didn’t pay much attention to it until they decided to mine guano and mineral nitrate deposits starting in the mid 1800s.  Now it’s primarily a copper port.

Old train engine in Antofagasta

 Old train engine

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 Robin poses in front of a mural for the Chuquicamata apartments

From there we headed to Avendida Arturo Prat, which is a pedestrian street for several blocks.  I think in the summer it’s a bit more interesting, as we missed the one street musician, a sax player who was leaving as we arrived.  We did stop for coffee, and this time I had a very good cup of espresso, though.

Back to the apartment for bread, cheese, and olives and a fair amount of wine.  Friday we pack up and drive to Calama, closest extant town to Robin’s birthplace, Chuquicamata.

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