Archive for January, 2017

Ice storm

Monday, January 16th, 2017

Goldfinch

One of the great joys of life is getting well when you’ve been sick. Robin and I have both had this awful cold that’s been going around — I missed parts of a couple of days of work, and last weekend we both just stayed in the house the whole time. I finally went to the doctor and got some antibiotics for the secondary infection and some predisone to clear up my sinus inflammation. Along with some good cough medicine, it started to do the trick. Still, I was happy on Friday the 13th that the university closed due to freezing rain, giving me a four-day weekend.

There wasn’t much ice in Cape Girardeau, but Pocahontas is enough farther north to make a difference. We had about a 1/4 inch on the trees, though the roads were warm enough that I don’t think it accumulated. Robin and I never left the house Friday, but I had to go out and refill the feeders, because it must get pretty tough to find food when it’s under a sheet of ice.

By Saturday I was feeling much better, and I started wondering if I could get anywhere to do some birding. I thought about Perry County Lake, which is close to the highway, and thus perhaps accessible; but when I went out to run an errand mid-morning I found that the roads were pretty clear. So, if I had my choice, I wanted to see Apple Creek for the first time in the new year.

When I got to the parking area near the boat ramp, it was raining lightly. I was warm enough in my coveralls and fedora, and I’m trying out a new shoulder bag for the camera that keeps it dry. So, rain or no I started walking the path westward. The fields nearby were thronged with sparrows; lots of white-throated, and it appeared to me that there were others mixed in, but they were shy, and staying too far away to be sure. Goldfinches mixed in as well.

When I stepped into the woods, the noise was almost deafening. At 36 degrees, with some new rain, the ice on the trees was melting and falling all around — it sounded like a downpour, and I could hardly hear anything else. But one thing I could see was a Brown Creeper who flew down to a large tree trunk and worked his way up in front of me. I’m always pleased to see a creeper — they’re so inconspicuous that I always feel like I’m in on a secret.

Ice falling off trees

Walking on down the track, I crested a hill and had a view of the woods all glazed with ice.

Apple Creek after the ice storm

By the time I got to the wetlands, the rain had stopped, and whenever I was out from under the trees I was staying pretty dry. A Hairy Woodpecker squeaked loudly at me from a snag, and when I lifted the binoculars to look at it, an immature bald eagle flew by behind. There were no waterfowl on the wetland – perhaps because there were a couple of loose dogs circling the far pool making a lot of noise.

My rule of thumb, which I think I first heard from Dennis Wheeler, is that you can’t go home until you’ve seen 30 species. By that standard, I barely made it, but with a single Yellow-Rumped Warbler, a few Eastern Bluebirds, and some Field Sparrows that popped up on the way out, I did finally hit it.

On Sunday, I was so well that I was able to sing in Unitarian fellowship. I took down the Christmas tree just in time to keep from overlapping MLK day, and brought in the traditional Yellow Submarine decoration.

Yellow Submarine

Sunday afternoon I drove across the river and counted birds at Sexton Creek and Cape Bend, adding records for the third week in January to both of them. My year count is at 50.

CBCs

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

Ruby-Crowned Kinglet

Christmas Bird Counts, that is. You can read about the history of the Christmas Bird Count, but in short, for 116 years, people have gone out and counted all the birds they could find around Christmas time and recorded the data. From December 14 through January 5, birders go to count circles — 15-mile diameter circles that have been established for this purpose- and count all the birds they can hear or see during a particular day. The data provide one of the longest-term longitudinal sets of information about the distribution and abundance of wildlife. Not to put too fine a point on it, you can see the effect of, for instance, climate change on the birds.

Changes in bird ranges

The count period goes 23 days. There are a couple of people who have committed themselves to doing a count every day for this period in a given year — Kelly McKay is one, and I saw him at the Mingo count yesterday. I wouldn’t stay married for long if I tried that, but I did four counts this year: Big Oak Tree, Union County, Horseshoe Lake, and Mingo.

Take Big Oak Tree as an example. The circle includes Big Oak Tree State Park and Ten Mile Pond and Seven Island conservation areas. On December 15, we met at 6:30 AM at Boomland in East Prairie for breakfast and area assignments. There were about a dozen of us, most from the Cape Girardeau/Jackson area. The Boomland breakfast is cafeteria style;I stuck with scrambled eggs and a cinnamon roll. But I know some of my birding friends look at this as their one opportunity of the year to eat biscuits and gravy.

By the time we finished breakfast, it was getting light, and my friend Mark and I drove south toward our usual piece of the circle — Big Oak Tree SP and Seven Island. Along the way, we pulled off for each little county road, getting out and counting the birds we saw and heard.

Big Oak CBC

Best birds of the day were a group of Lapland Longspurs in a field, and a surprise Merlin at a farmhouse on State Road 102. No pics of either, but I did get one of the little cemetery next to the farmhouse.

Little cemetery on Hwy 102